DCSIMG

Indicator Profile of Chloroform in Outdoor Air

Why Is This Important?

Most of the chloroform in the environment is man-made; it is used to make coolants, as a fumigant for grain, and as a dry cleaning spot remover. Other sources of chloroform emissions include: pharmaceutical manufacturing, cooling towers, the bleaching of pulp at pulp and paper mills with chlorine, bleach used for domestic cleaning and laundry, combustion of gasoline, and air stripping towers.

Low-level exposure to chloroform could result in dizziness, tiredness and headache. Exposure to higher concentrations is suspected to cause liver and kidney tumors. Chloroform is classified as a possible human carcinogen.

Chloroform Concentrations in Outdoor Air, by New Jersey County, NATA 2005

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Data Notes

Data Source: USEPA National-scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA), 2005 and NJDEP Division of Air Quality 

Other Graphical Views


Definition

Mean of modeled annual average chloroform concentration for census tracts in a county, 2005

How We Calculated the Rates

Numerator: Modeled mean chloroform concentration in micrograms per cubic meter
Denominator: N/A

Page Content Updated On 05/16/12, Published on 05/17/12
Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: nj.epht@doh.state.nj.us, Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht
The information provided above is from the New Jersey Department of Health's NJSHAD Web site (http://nj.gov/health/shad). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Sat, 22 November 2014 18:21:50 from New Jersey Department of Health, Center for Health Statistics, State Health Assessment Data Web site: http://nj.gov/health/shad".

Content updated: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 04:00:44 EDT